The Latest: 31.3 | Climate

Giles Goddard denounces Western attitudes to the environment; Gordon Blaine Steffey exposes the deceit and bullshit of climate deniers; Shanka Mesa Siverio attempts to build prosperous communities; Scott Jordan wants to negotiate the meaning of sustainability (by watching films!); Samia Rahman ponders polygamy; a short stories by Uzma Ali; poems by Helen Moore; and Mohammed Aidid and Fareha Rahman issue a call to arms.

The all-too-real prospect of environmental meltdown poses a whole new set of philosophical questions, but underlying them all is the challenge to the ever increasing population of humans on this planet: whether we have the capacity to transform our consumption for the sake of the generations after us.

We walked for days. I had placed the child with all her apparel on a donkey. They were the only livings things left in the village. She looked serene, in her red robes and priestly breast plate, despite the fact that our village had just been obliterated moments before.

Climate is critical terrain in the enduring polarisation of America, the roots of which lie in the mounting strife between fundamentalists and modernists at the turn of the twentieth century.

Polygamy is a contentious and often sensationalised topic yet audiences around the world seem to have an unlimited appetite for it.

Shocked by my own bulbous carbon footprint – which I recently calculated on the misguided expectation that I would be well below average – and inspired by the recent wave of climate change protests around the globe, I decided to take some climate action from a very local perspective.

Climate change. Truly this is the fundamental struggle of our age, whether or not we are willing to accept it. Yet here I sit, before my laptop. My brain is racked. I am defeated. What more can I say of global warming that the healthily grown tome of postnormal times writing hasn’t already touched upon. What cleaver path remains uncharted?